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FCJ-171 Expectations denied: Fan and industry conflict around the localisation of the Japanese video game Yakuza 3

Craig Norris University of Tasmania [Abstract] Introduction As various scholars (Jenkins, 2006a; Ito, 2007; Gray, 2010) have shown, fans can derive creative and emotional pleasure out of the ‘world building’ occurring in complex media franchises like Pirates of the Caribbean (Jenkins, 2007), and Star Wars (Brooker, 2002). Media industries are also increasingly valuing the contributions…

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FCJ-170 Challenging Hate Speech With Facebook Flarf: The Role of User Practices in Regulating Hate Speech on Facebook

Benjamin Abraham University of Western Sydney [Abstract] Introduction A recent spate of high profile cases of online abuse has raised awareness of the amount, volume and regularity of abuse and hate speech that women and minorities routinely attract online. These range from the responses garnered by Anita Sarkeesian’s (2012; 2014) video series ‘Tropes vs. Women…

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FCJ-169 Mapping Moving-Image Culture: Topographical Interface and YouTube

Stephen Monteiro The American University of Paris [Abstract] Navigation and mobility are defining characteristics of the contemporary media experience. Unlike the rigid, easily learned parameters of earlier media forms, global digital networks offer increasingly complex and constantly changing exchanges, formations, and compilations of information. Through a combination of hardware design and integrated software a range…

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FCJ-168 Do objects dream of an internet of things?

Teodor Mitew University of Wollongong [Abstract] Heteroclite I: Hermes, a walking statue In a fragment of a comedy by Plato Comicus, a statue of Hermes stumbles onstage and must answer the skeptic’s question: ‘Who are you? Tell me at once. Why are you silent? Won’t you speak?’ To which the statue replies, ‘I am Hermes,…

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FCJ-163 Olympic Trolls: Mainstream Memes and Digital Discord?

Tama Leaver Curtin University [Abstract] Introduction During 2012, the Australian and international press frequently deployed the accusation of ‘trolling’ as part of a wider moral panic about supposedly anonymous online abuse facilitated by social media. The term trolling has been applied to a range of activities, many of which are simultaneously labelled abuse, (cyber)bullying and…

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FCJ-159 /b/lack up: What Trolls Can Teach Us About Race

Tanner Higgin Independent Scholar [Abstract] I hate racists (even if I sometimes play one on the internet). Paulie Socash (Phillips, 2012) Closing Pools, Posing Questions I’d been a fringe observer of 4chan and /b/ for years, aware but ignorant of its pleasures and horrors. Then in a particularly aimless night of YouTube browsing, I watched…

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FCJ-166 ‘Change name to No One. Like people’s status’ Facebook Trolling and Managing Online Personas

Tero Karppi University of Turku, Finland [Abstract] Whitney Phillips (2012: 3) has recently argued that in order to understand trolls and trolling we should focus on ‘what trolls do’ and how the behaviour of trolls ‘fit[s] in and emerge[s] alongside dominant ideologies.’ [1] For Phillips dominant ideologies are connected to the ‘corporate media logic.’ Her…

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FCJ-162 Symbolic violence in the online field: Calls for ‘civility’ in online discussion

Shannon Sindorf University of Colorado, Boulder [Abstract] Introduction In light of early high hopes for the democratic potential of online discussion, the reality of attacks, hostility, vitriol, and at times racist and sexist sentiments can be alarming (Coffey and Woolworth, 2004; Carlin, Schill, Levasseur, and King, 2005; Hlavach and Frievogel, 2011; Richardson and Stanyer, 2011;…

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FCJ-154 Trolls, Peers and the Diagram of Collaboration

Nathaniel Tkacz University of Warwick [Abstract] I begin with two images. The first image is actually a diagram. [1] Call it the new diagram of work; specifically, of working together online. It is the diagram of collaboration. The diagram of collaboration is abstracted from any particular setting or function. There is no representation of time,…

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FCJ-154 Trolls, Peers and the Diagram of Collaboration

Nathaniel Tkacz University of Warwick [Abstract] I begin with two images. The first image is actually a diagram. [1] Call it the new diagram of work; specifically, of working together online. It is the diagram of collaboration. The diagram of collaboration is abstracted from any particular setting or function. There is no representation of time,…

more..