current

New Issue – FCJ-23

I’m pleased to announce the launch of
Issue 23 of The Fibreculture Journal
edited by Andrew Murphie and including papers from:

Ted Mitew:
FCJ-168 Do objects dream of an internet of things?

Stephen Monteiro:
FCJ-169 Mapping Moving-Image Culture: Topographical Interface and YouTube

Benjamin Abraham:
FCJ-170 Challenging Hate Speech With Facebook Flarf: The Role of User Practices in Regulating Hate Speech on Facebook

Craig Norris:
FCJ-171 Expectations denied: Fan and industry conflict around the localisation of the Japanese video game Yakuza 3

and a converastion with N. Katherine Hayles by Holger Pötzsch :
FCJ-172 Posthumanism, Technogenesis, and Digital Technologies: A Conversation with N. Katherine Hayes

In other news we have been very busy behind the scenes this year.

Issue 23 is one of three General Issues that were put together in response to our Contemporary Issues and Events CFP from earlier this year.
The second two issues in this series will be launched in early 2015.

On top of that we have three other issues set for publication over the year  – and very exciting plans for 2016.

I’ll leave you with grab from Andrew Murphie’s editorial:

In this issue we present four articles. We also present ‘Posthumanism, Technogenesis, and Digital Technologies’, an interview by Holger Pötzsch with one of the most important scholars of contemporary media and technology, N. Katherine Hayles. She discusses the entire arc of her research, including her recent research on nonconscious cognition. In the first of the articles, ‘Do objects dream of an internet of things?’, Teodor Mitew discusses what he calls ‘heteroclite sociable objects in the context of the emerging internet of things’ as a way of understanding the new kinds of sociality formed by the new networks of objects. In ‘Mapping Moving-Image Culture: Topographical Interface and YouTube’, Stephen Monteiro discusses the ‘cartographic and topographical aesthetics of digital interface and network navigation’ of YouTube’s post-Cosmic Panda redesign. In ‘Challenging Hate Speech With Facebook Flarf: The Role of User Practices in Regulating Hate Speech on Facebook’ Benjamin Abraham discusses a wonderfully clever and idiosyncratic example of resistance to hate speech. It is revealing of wider trends and possibilities with regard to this increasingly vexing problem. Finally, in ‘Expectations denied: Fan and industry conflict around the localisation of the Japanese video game Yakuza 3’, Craig Norris addresses the complex issues that arise when fans who feel they own a game are disappointed with its translation from one cultural context to another.

We hope you enjoy issue 23 of the Fibreculture Journal.
http://twentythree.fibreculturejournal.org/